Posts Tagged ‘recruitment’

18
Nov
2014

Silicon Milkroundabout – From both sides of the fence

by Roisi Proven

seedpacket

On Saturday May 10th, I nervously walked through the doors of the Old Truman Brewery for the first time. I’d heard good things about Silicon Milkroundabout, but had always been too nervous to give it a go myself. However, job dissatisfaction paired with the desire for a change drove me to finally sign up, and I was assigned a spot on the Saturday “Product” day.

I have to say as a first timer, the experience was a little overwhelming! The hall was already starting to fill up when I got there at 12pm, and there was a maze of stalls and stands to wade through. The SMR staff were very helpful, and the map of the hall I got on entrance made navigating the maze slightly less daunting.

I’d done my research before I got there on the day, and I had a little notebook of companies that I knew I needed to make time to speak to. There were 5 I felt I HAD to speak to, and a few that I was drawn to on the day, based on their stand or the company presence overall. At the top of my shortlist was Red Badger.

In May, RB had a small stand near the door, not in the middle of things but easy to find. I had to do a bit of awkward hovering to get some time with one of the founders, but when I did we had a short but interesting conversation. I took my card, filled in the form, and kicked off a process which led to me getting the job that I am very happy I have today.

Fast Forward to November, and my Saturday at Silicon Milkroundabout looks a whole lot different. This time, I’m not a candidate, I’m the person that people are selling themselves to. A different sort of weird! The Red Badger stall looks different this time around too. Where before we had a small table, this time around we had an award-winning shed.

badgershed

That awkward hovering I said I did? There was a lot of that going on. Having remembered how daunting it was to approach a complete stranger and ask for a job, I did my best to hoover up the hoverers. I had a few really interesting, productive conversations during the day, but just as many were people who just wanted to compliment us on our stand or our selfie video. It was great to get some positive feedback for all of the team’s hard work on the run up to the weekend.

The biggest difference was, given the fact I was standing still, I was able to fully appreciate the sheer amount of people that came through the doors, and the variety of roles that they represent. The team at SMR have done a great job of keeping the calibre of candidates high, and it does seem like there is a candidate for almost everything the companies are looking for.

Here at Red Badger we’ll be combing through the CVs and contacts that we made over the weekend, and will hopefully be making contact with a several potential new Badgers soon. For anyone that met us this time around, thanks for taking the time out to hang in our shed. For anyone that missed us, we’ll see you at SMR 9 next year!

21
Aug
2014

Computer Science students should work for a start up while at uni

by Albert Still

Don’t completely rely on your grades to get you a job after uni. A CS degree will prove you’re intelligent and understand the theory, but that will only take you so far during an interview. We have to talk about apps we’ve built with potential employers, just like you would want a carpenter to show you pictures of his previous work before you hired him.

While studying CS at university I worked 2 days a week for Red Badger, even in my final year when I had a dissertation. Some of my class mates questioned if it was a good idea suggesting the time it takes up could damage my grades. But it did the opposite, I got better grades because I learnt so much on the job. And when you see solutions to real life problems it makes for a better understanding to the theory behind it. And it’s that theory you will get tested on at university. 

What I’ve been exposed to that I wasn’t in lectures

  • Using open source libraries and frameworks. Theres rarely a need to reinvent the wheel, millions of man hours have been put into open source projects which you can harness to make yourself a more productive developer.
  • GitHub is our bible for third party libraries. Git branches and pull request are the flow of production.
  • Ruby - the most concise, productive and syntactically readable language I’ve ever used. Unlike Java which the majority of CS degrees teach, Ruby was designed to make the programmers work enjoyable and productive. Inventor Yukihiro Matsumoto in a Google tech talk sais “I hope to see Ruby help every programmer in the world to be productive, and to enjoy programming, and to be happy. That is the primary purpose of Ruby language”. Ruby is loved by start ups and consultants because they need to role out software quickly.
  • Ruby on Rails - built in Ruby it’s the most starred web application framework on GitHub. It’s awesome and the community behind it’s massive. If you want to have a play with it I recommend it’s “Getting started” guide (Don’t worry if you’ve never used Ruby before just dive in, it’s so readable you’ll be surprised how much Ruby you’ll understand!).
  • Good habits – such as the DRYYAGNI  and KISS principles. The earlier you learn them the better!
  • Heroku - makes deploying a web app as easy as running one terminal command. Deploy your code to the Heroku servers via Git and it will return you a URL to view your web app. Also its free!
  • Responsive web applications are the future. Make one code base that looks great on mobile, tablets and desktops. Twitter Bootstrap is the leading front end framework, it’s also the most starred repo on GitHub.
  • JavaScript – The worlds JS mad and you should learn it even if you hate it because it’s the only language the web browser knows! You’ll see the majority of the most popular repositories on GitHub are JS. Even our desktop software is using web tech, such as the up and coming text editor Atom. If you want to learn JS I recommend this free online book.
  • Facebook React – Once hard JS problems become effortless. It’s open source but developed and used by Facebook, therefore some seriously good engineers have developed this awesome piece of kit.
  • Polyglot – Don’t just invest in one language, be open to learning about them all.
  • Testing – This was not covered in the core modules at my university however Red Badger are big on it. Simply put we write software to test the software we make. For example we recently made an interactive registration form in React for a client. To test this we made Capybara integration tests, they load the form in a real browser and imitate a user clicking and typing into it. It rapidly fills in the form with valid and invalid data and makes sure the correct notifications are shown to the user. This is very satisfying to watch because you realise the time your saving compared to manually testing it.

Reasons for applying to a start up

  • They are small and have flat hierarchies which means you will rub shoulders with some talented and experienced individuals. For example a visionary business leader or an awesome developer. Learn from them!
  • More responsibility.
  • They’re more likely to be using modern front line tech. Some corporates are stuck using legacy software!
  • If they become successful you will jump forward a few years in the career ladder compared to working for a corporate.
  • Share options – own a slice of your company!
  • There are lots of them and they’re hiring!

Where to find start ups

A good list of hiring startups for London is maintained by the increasingly successful start up job fair Silicon Milk Roundabout. Also Red Badger are currently launching Badger Academy, they’re paying students to learn web tech! This is extremely awesome when you consider UK universities charge £9,000 a year. If your interested in applying email jobs@red-badger.com

Best,

Albert

There are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies, and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies.

C.A.R. Hoare, 1980 ACM Turing Award Lecture

14
Aug
2014

The Launch of Badger Academy

by Cain Ullah

Back in January this year I went away for a 10 day retreat. The initial intention was to get away from work completely. No phone. No internet. No work. However, unexpectedly it ended up being incredibly conducive to coming up with a whole plethora of creative ideas. Some were non-work related but lots of new ideas were very much work related. (See this blog post I have written on Founders Week: The Importance of Taking Time Out). One of these ideas, in its rawest form was how we can source and develop young talent and turn them into very highly skilled developers, designers, project managers or whatever else. This has resulted in the quiet launch of Badger Academy this week.

A little bit of context

At Red Badger, a huge amount of investment goes into recruitment. Finding the best talent out there is difficult. As a company we hang our hat on quality, quality being the #1 Red Badger defining principle. As a result, we’re very fussy when it comes to hiring people. This I am in no doubt, will hold us in great stead for the future, so we are determined to maintain our standards in staff acquisition. But it poses a problem – how do we scale the business to service our ever increasing demands from a rapidly growing sales pipeline, without reducing quality?

I think the answer is to improve our ability to develop from within. So, we are hatching plans to invest heavily in developing young talent to become senior leaders in their field. We realise this will take time but Badger Academy is the first experiment that we hope will fulfill the overall objectives.

A Blueprint for Success

In the summer of 2011 when we were a much, much smaller business, we put out a job ad for a summer intern. Out of the 60 or so applicants, one Joe Stanton stood out head and shoulders above the rest. By the time he joined us, he had just started his 2nd year of Uni so worked with us for 8 hours a week. He had bags of talent but obviously lacked experience and as a Computer Science degree student, was being taught vital foundational knowledge stuff that you’d expect from a Computer Science Degree. However, he had no knowledge of modern web application engineering practices such as Behaviour Driven Development.

At the time, we had much more time to spend with Joe to ensure that he was doing things properly and with our guidance and his astute intellect, he developed his knowledge rapidly. He then had a gap year with us during which he was deployed and billed on real projects before going back to part-time for his final year of University. He graduated this summer and after a bit of travelling around Europe, he joined us permanently. On his first day, he was deployed onto a project as a billable resource having had almost 3 years of industry experience. He has hit the ground running in a way that most graduates would not be able to.

Joe has been a resounding success. The problem is how you scale this to develop multiple interns especially now that as a company, our utilisation is much higher. We can no longer spare the senior resources to spend the sort of time we could with Joe at the very beginning.

JoeGrad.png

Joe Stanton – The Badger Academy Blueprint !!!

The Evolving Plan

When I was at the aforementioned retreat, my ideas were based around a project that we were just kicking off for an incredible charity – The Haller Foundation. We were embarking on a journey to build a responsive mobile web application to help farmers in Kenya realise the potential of the soil beneath their feet (For more info, search our previous blogs and look out for more info once the Haller website is officially launched later this year). What was key in my thinking was that we had planned for a mixture of experience in the project team which included two intern software engineers (one being Joe Stanton) that were working 2 days a week whilst completing their final year at Uni. We were delivering the project for free (so Haller were getting a huge amount of benefit) and we were training and developing interns at the same time. Win-win.

So, this formed the basis of my initial idea – The Red Badger Charity Division. We would use interns to deliver projects on a pro-bono basis for registered charities only. The charity would need to understand that this is also a vehicle for education and thus would need to be lax on their timelines and we would develop interns through real world project experience in the meantime. Although a great idea, this wasn’t necessarily practical. In the end, the Haller project required some dedicated time from some senior resources and cost us over £20K internally to deliver. A great cause but not a sustainable loss to build a platform for nurturing talent upon.

So, over several months after my retreat (7 to be exact) in-between many other strategic plans that were being put in place at Red Badger, with the help of my colleagues, I developed the idea further and widened its horizons.

Rather than being focussed on just charity projects (charity projects will remain part of the remit of the Badger Academy), we opened the idea out to other internal product development ideas as well. We also put a bit of thinking into how we could ensure the juniors get enough coaching from senior resources to ensure they are being trained properly.

Objective

Badger Academy’s primary objective is to train interns that are still at University who will be working part-time with a view to them having a certain level of experience upon graduation and hopefully joining Red Badger’s ranks. However, it may also extend to juniors who have already graduated (as a means to fast tracking them to a full-time job), graduates from General Assembly or juniors who have decided not to go to University.

It will require some level of experience. i.e. We will not train people from scratch. But once Badger Academy has evolved, the level of experience  of participants will vary greatly. In the long term we envisage having a supply chain of interns that are 1st years, 2nd years, gap year students and 3rd years, all working at once. Youth Development.png

Above is a diagram I drew back in April 2014 when initially developing the future strategy for Badger Academy. This has now been superseded and developed into a much more practical approach but the basic concept of where we want to get to still remains the same.

So what about the likes of General Assembly?

Badger Academy does not compete with the likes of General Assembly. We are working very closely with General Assembly, providing coaches for their courses and have hired several of their graduates. In fact, General Assembly fits in very nicely with Badger Academy. It is the perfect vehicle for us to hire a General Assembly graduate to fast track them over a period of 3 months until they are billable on projects. A graduate from General Assembly would generally not have been a viable candidate for Badger Academy prior to doing the General Assembly course. Like I say, all candidates need a certain level of experience beforehand. Badger Academy is not a grassroots training course.

Implementation

It is imperative that interns and juniors are trained by more senior resources. As a result we’ll be taking one senior resource for one day a week off of a billable project to dedicate their time to training the Badger Academy participants. To reduce impact on specific projects, we will rotate the senior coaches across multiple projects. We will also rotate by the three University terms. So for autumn term at Uni, we will have 3-4 senior coaches (all from separate projects) on weekly rotation until the end of the term. The spring term we will refresh the 3-4 coaches and again for the summer term. This way, everyone gets to teach, there is some consistency in tutors for the interns during term time and project impact is mitigated.

Summary

There will be a set syllabus of training topics for each discipline. As this is the first week, we have decided to build the syllabus as we go. Our current interns are both software engineers so we can imagine us getting pretty quickly into engineering practices such as testing strategy (E.g. BDD) but also other disciplines that are vital to delivering quality products such as Lean/Agile methodologies, devops and all of the other goodness that Red Badger practices daily.

This is an initial blog about our current activity but is light on detail. As this develops, we’ll formalise the approach and publish more insightful information of what this actually entails.

What we need to not lose sight of, is that this is an innovation experiment. We need to learn from it, measure our success (as well as our failures) and adapt. This is part of a long term strategy and we are just at the beginning.

Disclaimer: Red Badger reserves the right to change the name from Badger Academy. This has not been well thought through!

5
Oct
2012

Announcing our new non-executive directors

by Cain Ullah

As Red Badger grows steadily and moves into its next stage of development we are facing fresh new challenges every week. To assist our development we are delighted to announce two new non-executive directors who will provide us with the support and advice we need to help us realise our very big ambitions.

We’re very excited to announce the appointment of Mike Altendorf and Les Dawson OBE as Non-Executive Directors. Both will support Red Badger’s strategy  and help to drive business growth as Red Badger continues to deliver high quality, innovative technology to it’s current client base.

les_and_dorf

Mike Altendorf

Mike was the former founder of Conchango, one of the UK’s most successful digital consultancies and systems integrators. Mike has many years of experience in consulting services and technology, founding Conchango in 1991 and building it into a £45m+ revenue business before its sale to EMC Corporation in April 2008.

Les Dawson

Les is former CEO of Southern Water and current chairman at John Murphy & Sons. Les was also an Executive Director at United Utilities and was head of operations at Transco. He has over 30 years of experience in the industry and has a passion for driving business change through the innovative use of technology.

10
Jan
2012

We’re Hiring: Talented Agile Project Manager

by Cain Ullah

Location: Clerkenwell

Salary: Excellent plus Share Options

Red Badger is a creative software consultancy – we are working on some really innovative projects with some excellent calibre clients. Our integrated teams (PMs, BAs, UX, Designers, Devs, UI Devs, Testers) collaborate using agile project methodologies (Scrum and Kanban). We are a startup, having been in existence for 18 months and are growing rapidly. We are in need of a charismatic, talented Agile Project Manager to integrate into our talented team. You will be working on some very exciting projects ranging from Rapid Prototyping/Concept Lab type environments to longer term engagements.

You will need:

  • 3+ years running agile projects (Scrum experience is a must. Kanban is a bonus).
  • 1st Class Project Management Skills
  • An understanding of technology and experience working closely with technology teams to deliver projects
  • Be used to working in iterations, daily stand-ups and using velocity to determine what can be achieved
  • To be comfortable working in multi-disciplined teams
  • To be comfortable working very closely with clients
  • You need to lead
  • You need to be reliable and motivated
  • You need to have an eye for detail

Desirable:

  • Experience working in a User Centred Design environment

This is a great opportunity to work with in a really sociable, fun environment. Red Badger is still young but growing so you’ll be involved at an early stage in our history and to have influence in shaping our future.

For more information or to apply please contact us here: hello@red-badger.com